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Distorted Perspective Piece, Prototype

Distorted Perspective Piece, Prototype

So, this is sort of coming together. It’s a prototype, the acrylic frame is glued on badly, so that I can get it off later, to replace the glass with a more finished engraving. In the final show, the stand will be a cylinder of cast concrete, and the attachment between the box that holds the engraving and the stand will be better,  right now, it’s quite wobbly, but the stand is at this point, just a placeholder.

Last Minutes!

Last Minutes!

Tomorrow is my final hand-in, and I am still working on things. Like, actually still making stuff.

But, you know, it started to come together, so I couldn’t stop. This is something I’ve been trying to get to work for a long time now, and have been horribly failing at. The engraving’s not done, but I’ve learned a lot from it so far. It’s the biggest thing I’ve ever engraved, it’s 23 cm at the front edge, and about 47 cm long. It will eventually be an image of an Edinburgh street with the bay windows that are so typical here. Like with my other engravings this year, the dark points in the image are the clear, and the light points are opaque white. There are five lenses in the back side of the box that project images that overlay each other, through the clear parts of the engraving, which are mostly the building walls. 

Also, I found a stand for it in the wood and metal shop at Minto House, so that solves so many problems. I’ll make one that is intended for it purposefully, but I do like the idea of retrofitting old objects, and repurposing them into my work. Also, many thanks to Scott for running all over the university with me and helping with woodworking!

In the foreground of the image above is the first engraving I started for this, I I’m going to keep working on that after the hand-in tomorrow, and hopefully have this actually fully finished for the degree show at the end of the month. Below is a picture of the projection.

Netsuke

In looking back at this semester and the objects that I’ve been finishing, particularly the black and clear cameras, thinking about touchability, via Bonnie Kemske, and about Edmund De Waal’s “The Hare with the Amber Eyes.” I think it would be interesting to further explore Netsuke, as an influence or inspiration for the black “incalmo” cameras.

Portraits

Portraits

Things are coming together quickly now. It’s really nice to be in a flow of getting things done. I’ve forgotten to mention that I’ve posting progress pictures pretty regularly on Instagram these days, it’s great, because it keeps me going… if I need to do at least one thing that is worth taking a picture of each day, that means I’m definitely getting things happening. You can find me at www.instagram.com/ainsleyfrancis
The coloured, gravity formed portrait cameras are done. Pictures!

Not great pictures, but there will be more in the future, of course. 

Lasering the Perspective Box

Lasering the Perspective Box


I’ve modified my plans and decided to try lasering the box for the perspective piece, I’m not good enough at woodworking, and Alan is too busy to help, so I took it down to Keith’s laser. It didn’t cut through, really even after two passes, and he said that I should be able to cut it out with a stanley knife, so I’ll try… I’m skeptical. The engraving in the image above is actually sandblasted, with a vinyl resist. The reprographics guy was pretty skeptical that it would work, but I’m pretty happy with the results. Below is the beginning of one that I started with wheel engraving. They are different pieces of glass, so I’ll have two when they’re both done.

Glue! So much Glue!

Glue! So much Glue!

I’ve been doing so much glueing lately. I’m getting better at it, but I still don’t think I like it. Also, engraving:  

I love drawing on my glass. I really need to find a way to work that into my final objects. Especially pencil lines, they are just to delicate, and I love the texture they add to the image.

Black Cameras

Black Cameras

I’ve got some stuff that’s finished! and I took pictures! Charlotte helped. I think these are quite difficult to photograph, they work best with interaction, with the person in the image. It makes them make more sense when you can see the projection and it’s object at the same time, I think. Though, the images are misleading, since Charlotte is looking through them the wrong way, and she can’t see the projection herself.

Kiln Incalmo

Kiln Incalmo

I had a good talk with Amanda while she was in the studio about kiln glass and hot glass. It’s interesting, because I like to blow glass, and I’m not bad at it. I could practice more and I’d be better, of course, but I’ve had about three years of experience blowing, and I experimented a lot in that time with different techniques. That said, I am just not attracted to the aesthetic of the work I make it in the hot shop, and I don’t want to be required to have a relationship with a hot shop in order to make my work in the future. If I get to have access to one from time to time, that could be fun, but I don’t want to be dependant on it. Also, I like the sharp lines of cut and kiln glass. But, still people keep telling me that I “could do that in the hotshop” and, in many situations, it’s true.
Amanda’s work is sort of similar, she goes through a long process in the kiln to do something that could ostensibly be done in the hot shop. We were talking about this because the black cameras reference incalmo, a glass blowing technique where two different coloured cups are fused together at the lip into one vessel that has two (or more) colours, separated by straight bands. I like it in blown glass, but the cast, glued and cut glass is just so sharp and direct. I am often told that what I’m doing could be done through hotshop processes, which is sort of true. Yes, I could make heavy clear and black incalmo, but there would be so many problems with them. These are small… about 10 cm diameter. The clear part is solid glass, and the black part is hollow. I love the weight of them. Black is softer than clear, and the best way to put the lens in would be to make it fit into the “neck” of the vessel (which is a thing I’ve been thinking about for these, it could be interesting to make vessels where the stopper was the lens). So, with heavy clear away from the pipe and soft black near the pipe, keeping control of these in the hot shop would be difficult,  they could be done the other way around, keeping the clear heavy side near the iron, but even then, the line definition that I get in the cut and glued version would be lost.